Archive for the Sex Category

‘THE GOTHIC IS A WAY TO ENTER THE TABOO.’ AN INTERVIEW WITH THE LODGERS SCREENWRITER DAVID TURPIN

Posted in Festivals, Ghosts, Goth, Interviews, Movies, Sex with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2018 by darklordbunnykins

rachel

Everyone loves a good Gothic ghost story, especially one drenched in murder, dread, and the promise of deviant sex. The Lodgers delivers all these things, but director Brian O’Malley’s follow-up to the gory Let Us Prey is a far different if no less horrifying beast.

The setting is post-WWII rural Ireland. Charlotte Vega ([REC] 3: Genesis) stars as Rachel, a young woman living alone with her twin brother Edward (Bill Milner) in their decaying childhood home. The siblings, whose parents died years earlier, are cursed to stay in the house or suffer a terrible fate at the spectral hands of unseen beings. This terrifying childhood idyll is about to be shattered by the onset of adulthood, and Rachel’s diffident attraction to Sean (Eugene Simon, Game of Thrones), a newly-returned and wounded vet.

The DLB spoke with screenwriter David Turpin about The Lodgers during the film’s world premiere at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

On the origin of the script:

It was a game I played with myself as a child. We lived in a flat upstairs and there was another flat below us, and I used to imagine beings coming out of the lower part of the house while we were asleep. So that idea was always buzzing around in my mind from I guess when I was 5 or 6 years old.

rachel and bermingham

On the influence of Jean Cocteau’s 1929 novel Les Enfants Terrible (The Holy Terrors), also about isolated siblings whose bond is shattered by the pressures of adolescence:

And then I thought if you take that kind of weird sibling relationship and then you planted that within a Shirley Jackson world or a Turn of the Screw; you took that weird psychosexual thing, and you used the horror as a way of heightening it and sort of exploding it out.

 

On Shirley Jackson:

I love the eerieness she creates, the sense of evil, sometimes in the banal. I find her quite fascinating.

edward floor

The house as character as a trope in horror and Gothic literature:

When I was writing I was always visualizing the artist Edward Gorey. His designs for Dracula; those kinds of cavernous spaces, interiors that look like they’ve been burned down and people have continued living in them. I was thinking of those kinds of eerie, decrepit spaces.

I was also thinking of Shirley Jackson and Hill House and the house as a kind of organic beast. I was thinking of all the great dilapidated houses, like the one in Edward Scissorhands with the huge hole in the roof. All these wonderful places. The House of Usher.

 

On the haunted estate of Loftus Hall where much filming took place:

It seemed to pretty much perfectly capture what was on the page and also bring more to it. Because when you’re writing a script you don’t know how many sets you’re going to have, you don’t know basically what you’re going to be able to afford. How ambitious can your production design be?

There was a great production designer, Joe Fallover, who worked on it. But the house itself was such a gift because it came so close to what I imagined, even before Joe came in and added all his design to it.

rachel edward

On twins:

The idea of someone who is you but isn’t you, it’s such a fascinating idea. You have all these great doppelgangers in Gothic literature and in film. There’s just something so incredibly uncanny about seeing yourself in another person. I always find it uncanny when I meet the children or parents of a friend of mine; you can see the genetic resemblance moving through the generations, and twins are the most extreme example of that.

One of the things I think horror helps us to do is explore very troubling psychological states; especially sexual things are very hard for us to talk about. And twins are a great way of exploring conflict within one’s self. The feeling that we all have of being torn, of being ambivalent or suspended between two different things; wanting something but needing something else; loving but hating something at the same time. And twins, because it’s two people, you can really visualize that. What the film is really about is these two young people are coming of age at the same time, they’re both at the beginning of sexual adulthood. One of them is able to process it and move forward, one of them is not able to process it, and is destroyed by it. I think everyone encounters a moment in their lives when they could go either way. And the great thing about the twins is they allow us to show both ways simultaneously.

rachel in bed

On the film’s deviant sexuality:

The gothic is a way to enter the taboo. And they’re not taboo just because they’re wrong; they’re taboo and they’re wrong and we want to know what it feels like. The gothic allows us to step into the unacceptable and live the unacceptable.

Those ideas of warped or wrong sexuality… I love the original Cat People, which is a film about bestiality. Paul Schrader’s remake of Cat People touches on both bestiality and incest. Much of horror is about frightening us and exciting us. It’s also about creating a safe space to talk about things that are deeply troubling and about giving us a set of metaphors so that we can talk about things that we may not know how to express otherwise. It’s sort of like dreams in that way.”

 rachel in house

On the rules Rachel and Edward follow:

I’m very interested in folklore, folktales, and oftentimes they’ll involve quite a schematic idea, or in the way in a folktale they’ll be a repeated rhyme, like in Hansel & Gretel. And I wrote the words of the little song quite early in the writing of the film. And it just seemed to me that if you lived in this weird closed world where you were sealed off from everything else you would have a series of codes that you lived by that are very strict. And it became a metaphor for the idea of sexual rebellion and the idea that we are all kept in check by various rules, and we all need to transgress past those rules to know who we are. But at the same time society says, ‘Transgress past these rules and you will be destroyed.’ So becoming an adult is finding a way to transgress the rules just enough to be able to live and know yourself and not be destroyed.

 

On fate:

I guess the closest we come to [Edward in gothic fiction] is Roderick Usher. And I always loved in The Fall of the House of Usher the way though there’s a curse on the family, there’s some kind of security in that, in that it gives him a way of understanding the world. Like so many of us I don’t know what the world is about! I feel very lost a lot of the time. I think most people do. But Roderick Usher, and Edward in our story, they understand; they know what the world is about. It’s about this curse, it’s about this fate. They aren’t fluffing around in the breeze not knowing what to do. I guess it’s the way some people’s identity can be shaped by their victimization.

There’s also in the idea of fate and the curse; the transgression is so extreme that it can go down from generation to generation. And I think we’re all fascinated by those ideas of curses, and horror gives us a way to look at that. It’s so much part of human history, the feeling that one might be cursed because of what one’s ancestors had done. I teach a little bit of American gothic literature. The idea that America as a country is haunted because there is a horrible blood crime at the root of what America is. It’s fascinating, the idea that your crimes will return, and they’re so extreme that they’ll return for generations after you. You may not pay for your crimes, but eventually somebody on your side will.

The Lodgers opens in limited release in the US and on iTunes Feb. 23.

WRETCHED RE-ISSUES: THE ENTITY (1982)

Posted in Devils, DVD, Ghosts, Monsters, Movies, Reviews, Rue Morgue, Sex, Supernatural, Thriller with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2012 by darklordbunnykins

THE ENTITY (1982)

Starring Barbara Hershey, Ron Silver and David Labiosa

Directed by Sidney J. Furie

Written by Frank De Felitta

Anchor Bay

Despite online chatter that an Entity remake is on the way (allegedly helmed by Ringu director Hideo Nakata), I find that hard to imagine. First, what studio is going to finance a movie about a malevolent spirit that repeatedly rapes the leading lady? Secondly, which actress would be brave enough to step into the shoes of the original’s star, Barbara Hershey? While not perfect by any means, the original Entity remains a disturbing film made in a bolder time, and a new version would likely be toothless by comparison.

Continue reading

EXCL: KATRINA BOWDEN TALKS “PIRANHA 3DD”

Posted in Eye Candy, Gore, Interviews, Monsters, Movies, Sequels, Sex, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2012 by darklordbunnykins

Meagan Tandy and Katrina Bowden in Piranha 3DD (Dimension Films)

Katrina Bowden co-stars in the horror-comedy sequel Piranha 3DD, which opens wide today. The 30 Rock star plays the virginal Shelby, not her first venture into the genre as she also starred in the underrated Tucker & Dale vs. Evil. Bowden can next be see in the Toronto-shot psychological thriller Nurse 3D co-starring opposite Paz de la Huerta (Into the Void, HBO’s Boardwalk Empire.

Katrina, you’ve starred in a couple of horror films now, including Tucker and Dale vs. Evil. Are you a horror or horror-comedy fan?

I like horror-comedy. I think it’s a really fun genre, and when it’s done well it’s really great to watch.

Horror movies I’m not so great with. I get so scared. I’m kind of a baby when it comes to that. I’ve never really been a horror fan myself, going out to go see the new horror movies, for the only reason being that I can’t really handle them. I respect how they’re made; I think it’s a really cool genre to be part of it and to make.

What do you like about your character Shelby?

She’s kind of like the damsel-in-distress. She’s kind of shy and a little bit more reserved, but then everything bad that happens to her and has all these close calls and she almost dies. She’s in no way a hero type of person, but it was fun to play a shy type of girl.

What is your director John Gulager really good at?

He’s really good at making things look really gross. The blood, the vomiting scene, he was very excited to do that scene. I think I did that five times because he wanted the puke-up to be the perfect one. And he’s really good at setting things up to be really shocking. He did all the Feast movies; that’s kind of his thing and he does it really well, and he does it in a funny, humorous way.

Not Katrina Bowden

What was the mood like on set?

It was fun. It was very light-hearted and fun, and we all had a good time. We all knew we were getting ourselves into something… we’re going to be covered in blood and be in the water, and we were down for anything.

Without giving away too much, your character Shelby is involved in a rather nasty sexual encounter with a boy and a piranha. What was that scene like to film, especially given how bloody it gets?

It was pretty difficult. I think like any kind of love scene, it’s really uncomfortable to shoot, but then you add all these extra elements into it, it becomes that much more uncomfortable and awkward for everyone.

So that was a really hard night, wondering how it was going to turn out. I wanted it to look good and be funny and realistic. It was a hard scene to shoot, but I think it turned out really well. It was worth it.

What was it like working with the piranha themselves?

That was actually really cool because the guys who did the special effects for the movie they made all that, and I just find that fascinating that they can create these kinds of things that can move and do things and spit blood. They’re really beautiful in person. I think it’s cool that they did so much practically instead of relying on CGI for everything.

You also star in the upcoming horror film Nurse 3D. What was it like to work with your co-star Paz de La Huerta?

She’s definitely a very intense person. Not the easiest person to work with, but it really helps her craft. She just dives into a character, even if her character happens to be a psychopathic serial killer. So it doesn’t really equal a fun working environment, but I think it will help the movie definitely.

Are you eager to have fans see a darker side of you in that film?

Yeah. I was really eager to do some darker roles or something more intense or different from what I’ve already done. I think it’s challenging

Both that film and Piranha 3DD are in 3D. What are the challenges of working in 3D?

I do like 3D. I think it’s a really cool way to shoot a film as an element that a lot of movies don’t have. It makes it a little more difficult shooting-wise because there are more shots where you have to be conscious of where things are in terms of where the camera is. But it’s fun, and it’s not really that much different from shooting a regular movie.

MACABRE MOVIES: THE WICKER TREE (2012)

Posted in DVD, Music, Reviews, Sex with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2012 by darklordbunnykins

THE WICKER TREE (2012)

Starring Brittania Nicol, Henry Garrett and Graham McTavish

Written and directed by Robin Hardy

Anchor Bay Entertainment

 

The prospect of a new movie from The Wicker Man director Robin Hardy set in the same universe as that horror classic provoked mixed emotions when it was first announced under the title The Riding of the Laddie. The novel upon which Hardy has based his script, his own Cowboys for Christ, was plain awful, showing a lack of understanding of American culture and feeling very much like a pallid copy of its source material. Could the movie be substantially better?

Continue reading

WRETCHED REVIEWS: “THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO”

Posted in Eye Candy, Goth, Movies, Reviews, Serial Killers, Sex, Tattoos, Thriller, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 20, 2011 by darklordbunnykins

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO

Starring Rooney Mara, Daniel Craig and Christopher Plummer

Directed by David Fincher

Written by Steve Zaillian from the novel by Stieg Larsson

Columbia Pictures

First of all, macabre movie fans, yes, we do get to hear Karen O, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’s version of Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song,” in a stunning opening credits sequence that rivals anything Maurice Binder ever created for the early Bonds and makes me want to get in line to watch this film again.

That aside, there are many reasons for horror fans to want to see this film: David Fincher’s dark, edgy aesthetic is in full effect; Rooney Mara is a Goth goddess, more frail physically than Noomi Rapace, the original Lisbeth Salander, but still tough as nails; and Reznor and Ross’s score walks the line between eerie and ambient.

Continue reading

NSFW! JOANNA ANGEL TO LAUNCH FRANKENSTEIN PARODY

Posted in Fetish, Halloween, Images, Monsters, News, Online, Sex, Tattoos with tags , , , , , , on October 28, 2011 by darklordbunnykins

Beloved punk-porn princess and entrepreneur Joanna Angel is set to release a XXX web-only Frankenstein parody on her website this, um, coming Monday. Go to www.JoannaAngel.com on Halloween. For a preview teaser of Fuckenstein, which stars Joanna Angel with James Deen as Dr. Frankenstein and Spanish performer Ramon Nomar as Frankenstein, visit: http://xoxojoannaangel.com/2011/10/fuckenstein-free-teaser-and-pictures/.

“Every year on BurningAngel.com we celebrate Halloween with a horror themed movie,” says Joanna in a statement. “Parodying Frankenstein was a lot of fun – and I have a new found fetish for having sex with scientific experiments and monsters.”

TORONTO AFTER DARK REVIEW: THE THEATER BIZARRE

Posted in Art, Gore, Monsters, Movies, Sex, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 24, 2011 by darklordbunnykins

THE THEATRE BIZARRE

Directed by Richard Stanley, Douglas Buck, Buddy Giovinazzo, David Gregory, Karim Hussain, Tom Savini and Jeremy Kasten

Severin Films

 

Anthology films are by nature a mixed cinematic bag. After all, some are going to be better than others. Fortunately, in the case of The Theatre Bizarre, it’s more a matter of difference than quality, making this both a sweet and sour mix of horror bon mots that will appeal to various tastes, especially those with an appreciation of the Grand Guignol tradition.

The film’s framing tale sees a young woman (Virginia Newcomb) enter a decrepit theatre hosted by a clockwork figure played by Udo Kier. The figure introduces six tales, creeping ever close to his audience member and curiously growing more human with every story. It’s a creepy framework for a potpourri of nasty narratives.

Continue reading