Archive for George Romero

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD LIVE RISES IN TORONTO

Posted in Events, Gore, Movies, Theatre, Zombies with tags , , , , , , , on April 27, 2013 by darklordbunnykins
Photo: Christos Kalohoridis

Photo: Christos Kalohoridis

While I had to miss opening night of Night of the Living Dead Live — damn you, Dark Prince Bunnykins! — the theatrical version of the classic zombie film, put on by the fine folks of Hamilton, Ontario’s Nictophobia Films at Toronto’s Theatre Passe Muraille, looks to be a fun (and funny) take on George Romero’s debut feature. The DLB spoke to co-writer/director Chris Bond, the man behind Evil Dead: The Musical, and executive producer Phil Pattison about resurrecting NotLD on stage.

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SINFUL CINEMA: “ALIEN 2: ON EARTH” (1980)

Posted in Aliens, DVD, Gore, Monsters, Movies, Reviews, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 22, 2011 by darklordbunnykins

 

ALIEN 2: ON EARTH (1980)

Starring Belinda Mayne, Mord Bodin and Roberto Barrese

Written and directed by Ciro Ippolito

Midnight Legacy

 

Italian knock-offs of Hollywood hits were a rampant phenomenon in the 1970s. Perhaps the most successful example artistically was Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (1978). Released as Zombi 2, it benefitted from the Italian release of George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead under the name Zombi. Similarly Alien 2: On Earth tries to piggyback off the success of Ridley Scott’s landmark 1979 hit Alien, albeit to comparatively lacklustre results.

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INSIDIOUS INTERVIEWS: GEORGE A. ROMERO ON “SURVIVAL OF THE DEAD”

Posted in DVD, Gore, Interviews, Movies, Zombies with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2010 by darklordbunnykins

Director George A. Romero

Survival of the Dead is George A. Romero’s sixth zombie film, and its imminent theatrical run in Toronto, followed soon after by its arrival on DVD and Blu-ray, meant that the legendary horror director, now relocated to Toronto from his long-time home in Pittsburgh, was available to talk.

Set a couple of months into the zombie outbreak, Survival follows a group of soldiers as they seek refuge on Plum Island, a remote piece of land controlled by The Flynns and The Muldoons, rival families whose decades-long enmity has barely been erupted by the outbreak of the undead.

Heavily influenced by the classic 1958 Western The Big Country, Survival is more black comedy than horror film, with Romero fully indulging his love of EC Comics and Looney Tunes cartoons in some of the more outrageous kills. As usual, Romero uses his zombies to help illustrate a larger social principle, rather than simply employing them as bringers of destruction.

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